Information You Shouldn’t Share on Facebook

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There’s no denying the popularity of Facebook.  And while there are certainly privacy concerns that arise from using Facebook, it can be a great way for people to stay in touch and for organizations to connect with their communities.

However, it seems more and more, people are (over)sharing details of their lives on Facebook.  At times, sharing too much information can be dangerous.  At other times, it can simply be annoying.  Here are some pieces of information that you should consider avoiding when sharing details of your life via Facebook.

Privacy and Safety Concerns

  1. Information that you use as part of your passwords (such as pet names, hometowns, graduation dates, birthdays)
  2. Information that you use as a clue if you forget your passwords
  3. Your full birth date
  4. Images and names of your children
  5. Your plans to be away from your home
  6. The status of your financial situation

That’s Just Too Much Information

  1. Your schedule for bodily functions, including successes and failures in this department
  2. What you really think of your boss or coworker
  3. Negative thoughts about your employer (even if you are a man in a pierogie costume for the Pittsburgh Pirates)
  4. That you are engaging in illegal activities (even if you think they are really cool)
  5. Information that contradicts where you said you’d be at a given time
  6. Information that makes you appear quite healthy when taking a “sick day”
  7. Anything to do with your skill level at playing games on Facebook

The Bottom Line

If you have to question whether or not something is appropriate to share, it’s probably not.

Share Your Thoughts

Is there other information that you think is a bad idea to share?  Is there any information that annoys you when you see it shared?  We’d love to hear from you.

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David Hartstein is the storyteller and measurement guy at Wired Impact where he routinely reads and writes about nonprofits and web geekery. He used to teach elementary school and often walks around barefoot. You can catch up with David on Twitter at @davharts.

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