12 Types of Tweets Your Nonprofit Should Be Sharing

Nonprofit Tweets on Twitter

Just because your nonprofit does amazing things doesn’t mean that’s all you should talk about on Twitter.

If you use Twitter even semi-regularly, you’ve probably had this experience:

You come across an organization you’re really excited to follow.  You love their mission and the work they do.  Then you glance through their Twitter stream.  And you’re greeted with an endless barrage of requests for donations, plugs for upcoming events and an occasional request to Like them on Facebook.  As your excitement wanes, you close the stream, disappointed.

Your followers deserve more from you than unending appeals for help.  Here are a few types of Tweets your nonprofit should drop into the mix.

Links to Resources Related to Your Mission

Sharing content created by others is an excellent way to mix up what you share on Twitter.  Make sure it’s relevant to your mission so that you’re offering value to your followers.

For an added bonus, mention the content producer by Twitter username (complete with the @ symbol).  That way they’ll be notified you’re sharing their content and will be more likely to engage with your nonprofit.

Retweet Info Shared by Others

Along the same lines, retweet content shared by others that’s relevant to your mission.  Retweeting is a great way to share helpful content without taking a ton of your time.  It also notifies the account you retweeted, increasing the likelihood they’ll check you out.

Relevant Current Events

There’s likely news related to your mission happening all the time.  Share it with your followers.  Tell them your thoughts on what’s going on.  Provide them resources to understand the situation better.

Celebrate Your Supporters

Don’t just talk about how amazing your organization is.  Talk about how amazing your supporters are.

Your donors, volunteers and advocates enable you to do all those things you do in your community.  So share their impact via Twitter.

Links to Your Content

It’s fine to promote yourself as well.   But instead of simply asking for money or volunteers, provide links to valuable content on your website.

Maybe it’s a new blog post.  Or a resource you have on your site.  Whatever it is, make sure it’s valuable to your Twitter followers before posting it.

Compelling Data

Have short snippets of compelling data?  Twitter is an excellent place to share it.

Make sure it’s simple and easy to understand.  If appropriate, provide a link to a relevant resource where your followers can learn more.

A Glimpse into Your Work in the Community

Many of your supporters can’t join you in the community you serve.  But you can use Twitter as a way to give them a glimpse of what your work in the community looks like.

Share compelling photos and videos of your organization in the field.  This type of content can be a great way to rally support for your nonprofit and the work you do.

Community Stories

Use Twitter to share stories of those you serve.  This can be a great way to spark interest in your mission and the work your organization does on a daily basis.

Sometimes it can be as simple as sharing a single photo.

Questions to Your Community

Want to know the sort of content your Twitter followers are interested in?  Ask them.

You can ask all sorts of questions of your followers, including:

  • What questions do you have about (a certain topic)?
  • What topics would you like us to cover on our blog?
  • What inspires you to take action (related to your mission)?
  • Who’s going to (an upcoming event)?  What are you most excited about?

Directly asking your community questions can be a great way to engage them in dialogue and produce content tailored to their interests.

Ask for Feedback

Twitter can be a great place to ask your followers for feedback.  After a fundraising campaign or event, ask your community what inspired them.  Ask what they’d like to see changed in the future.

Get their feedback to consider for future events and campaigns.

Have a good example of this?
Share it and I’ll update the post 
with a shout out to you.

Talk About Other Organizations

There’s a good chance you partner with other incredible organizations.  Talk about them.  Share the great stuff they’re doing with your followers.

If you share the stellar work of other organizations, there’s a good chance it will enhance your relationship with them.

Share an Inspirational Quote

People on Twitter love quotes.  Please don’t go overboard and share tons of trite quotes each day, but an occasional quote can help fuel some engagement from your followers.

Mix It Up

The bottom line is you need to mix it up on Twitter.  Sharing a variety of tweets can help keep your stream fresh and make it far more likely someone interested in your organization will follow you.

Have any other types of tweets you share at your nonprofit?  Or do you follow a nonprofit that does a great job of sharing on Twitter?  Post examples and links in the comments below.  I’d love to check them out.

Related Reads

5 Ways to Avoid Annoying Your Nonprofit’s Twitter Followers

Figuring Out Who to Follow on Twitter

Effectively Using Twitter Lists to Get More Out of Twitter

Image courtesy of HTSABO, Flickr